Wampler Pedals - 2016 new models and the whole v2 thing.

As you all know, we had a little bit of a spring clean towards the latter end of last year that meant the entire line/range had a facelift! It was exciting times that if we are honest, was culmination of many many months of work that saw everything change. It was quite a massive undertaking doing it all at once to be fair! All of our pedals now have top jacks and relay based soft switching (with the exception of the minis due to space constraints, having said that, the stomp on the newer Tumnus is slightly better than the older one). Each had a new paint job, new logo, refreshed under graphics, clearer labelling, better in-box manual, new box, new bag and even a Wampler branded battery!! 

This does not mean they are all now v2.

With the exception of The Faux Tape Echo and Pinnacle Deluxe, all the circuits remained the same. 

Many of our dealers have been advertised the older pedals as v1 and the newer as v2 purely to separate the two and allow a slight discount on the older models to move them on in favour of the newer ones. 

For example:

So, in a nutshell here is the official word. The ONLY pedals that are v2 are the Faux Tape Echo and Pinnacle Deluxe, everything else has just been brought into line with the pedals that have been released over the last couple of year.

So, unless it has v2 on it - the circuit is the same, it is not a v2 in any way and tonally; it's effectively the same as the previous models.

I hope that clears up any confusion!!

 

2106, a year in review

Now that 2016 is coming to an end, we’d like to take the time to thank all of the tone chasers out there for all of the support this year. It’s been an interesting time to say the least, with one of the longest dry spells between releases that we’ve ever had (it was excruciating for us!). During that time we took the opportunity to buckle down and reformat our brand to make it a bit more cohesive across the line-up, with many of our pedals receiving a makeover, either cosmetically with graphics, or the conversion to soft relay switching and top jacks. The goal with this switchover is to increase the longevity of the life of the pedal by reducing the amount of pressure needed to activate the pedal, along with the highly requested top jack feature for squeezing more onto the board.

Along with the aforementioned upgrades, we also released the Mini Ego compressor, Pinnacle Deluxe v2, and the Faux Tape Echo v2. The Mini Ego is something that we announced back in January due to high demand and consistent requests for it, but finally got out to everyone after overcoming a few hurdles in production. It squeezes (pun intended) the great tones from the Ego Compressor standard into a mini enclosure, and has been met with great response so far. The tone and attack knobs have been converted into 2-way switches which are common tones that we've honed in on for maximum versatility in conjunction with the other controls, especially with the Blend knob.

The Pinnacle Deluxe v2 was something Brian had been working on for awhile, and he wanted to step outside of the “Brown sound” box and provide something insanely versatile and tweakable to achieve a plethora of great tones, potentially becoming the only distortion you could possibly need! He added a 3-band EQ, along with multiple gain stages that range from light gritty overdrive with the volume on your guitar rolled back, to a full on soaring wall of sound with both the gain boost and the footswitchable boost engaged. He also addressed a common issue where there was too much sag on high output guitars, so a SAG switch was included to accommodate those as well.

The Faux Tape Echo v2 expanded on the predecessor by adding one of the most requested features we’ve ever had, which is for subdivisions to go along with the tap tempo. The modulation section was updated with streamlined controls for depth and speed, deciding to forgo the switch for activation. We’re VERY proud of these new pedals and glad that they’re making it into the hands of the tone chasers that can put them to good use!

Finally, we released the Bravado 40w pedal platform amp. It’s an all tube, handwired on turret board design that is made specifically for the pedal addict who uses their pedals for dirt and that are looking for the perfect canvas to create their own tonal work of art on. Along with being the perfect platform for dirt pedals, the FX loop was also designed with Dave Friedman to have zero tone loss and make your time-based and modulation effects sound pristine and fantastic.

Going forward into 2017, we’re VERY excited about some of the things we’re working on. There will be something new at Winter NAMM, and many more things in process of being developed for our 2017 release schedule. We’re so thankful for the support and the feedback, and we’re looking forward to an even more exciting 2017!

Troubleshooting - A beginners guide...

There’s honestly nothing worse than the feeling of going to jam, and something isn’t working correctly in your chain. It’s a mix of emotions, from sad to angry to just generally a “What the heck?” moment. The next process involved is troubleshooting or searching on the internet for the answer. First and foremost we suggest contacting the manufacturer of the pedal for help. This cuts to the chase by going direct to the source, especially in terms of warranty and beginning the process for repairs (if necessary).This is just a helpful guide of sorts to narrow down areas to troubleshoot on your own prior to moving forward. These are common ways to troubleshoot that apply to nearly every pedal out there.

The first thing to try when anything is acting wacky with a pedal is to isolate it for testing. This removes any other variables and focuses on the cleanest and simplest signal path to troubleshoot. Start with your guitar going out with a confirmed working cable to the input of the pedal, with the pedal having a fresh 9v battery (if applicable, not with minis) and disconnected from your power supply, straight into the amp. If the pedal behaves correctly, then you know the problem was somewhere else in the chain. If the issue is still occurring, document everything you can to better help identify the problem for the tech. If there’s no output, try cutting the footswitch off and on several times, if it comes on occasionally, it could be a bad footswitch. If you turn a knob and the sound seems really odd or has no effect at all, it could be a bad pot. Does the LED cut on? Any small detail will help when you’re going to have it repaired.

Batteries – Some companies ship their pedals with batteries, some do not. Leaving a cable plugged into the input of a pedal will drain the battery, even if it’s not being used. One good idea to practice is if you’re using a power supply to power your pedals, remove the battery to prevent corrosion over time. If you do use a battery, be sure to use a fresh, unused battery

Power – Digital effects especially are more prone to be noisy if you’re not using a dedicated, isolated power source to power the pedal. Daisy-chaining digital effects with analog pedals or other digital pedals will create substantial noise. Isolated power supplies can be a bit expensive, but they’re worth the investment in the long run. If you’re concerned it’s a power issue and you’ve tried it isolated with a battery, then there could be an issue with the cable from the power supply, or with the power jack. Note: Using the wrong power supply can render a pedal useless, and that is not covered under most warranties. Our pedals in particular require a barrel-type (Boss style), center-negative power supply cable. Some pedals have the ability to run anywhere from 9v to up to 18v (and anywhere in between), where some will be rendered useless if run above 9v. Check out this blog for an in-depth detail of which of our pedals can be used at 9v and 18v: http://www.wamplerpedals.com/news/blog/talking-about-gear/power-9v-or-18v

Footswitch popping during activation – If your pedal has recently started an excessively loud pop when you first activate it after moving pedals around on your board, there could be an issue with the impedance the pedal is seeing. For starters, try the first step and isolate it and see if that is taking care of it. If it’s no longer popping, then another pedal in your chain is causing an impedance issue, so try swapping positions on your board could fix it. Bad cables can be the culprit as well.

Crackling Pots – This would signal dirty pots, which can be solved by using an contact cleaner, which is discussed more here: http://www.wamplerpedals.com/news/blog/talking-about-gear/cleaning-the-pots-on-your-pedals

There are a multitude of different things that can go on based solely on the fact that you’re stepping on electronic devices repeatedly, so despite every builder’s best efforts things do fail. This is exactly why we personally offer a 30-day customer satisfaction guarantee and return policy when purchased directly through our website.

Bravado 40w Amp

 Brian Wampler has taken his intimate knowledge of circuits and built the Bravado from the ground up, designed to be the ultimate high-headroom clean pedal platform.

The Bravado is equipped with 6L6 power tubes and delivers 40 watts of clarity that works well with nearly every pedal, making it sound exactly how you expect it to - perfect. Unlike almost every other amp on the market, the Bravado is engineered to give players warmth and natural tube compression that gels with all types of pedals, whether a simple boost or massive distortion.

When it comes to the EQ, the Bravado provides a multitude of tweakable tones. A wide range three-band EQ sculpts any pedalboard while the tube-buffered effects loop is a nice warm place for your delay/reverb effects.

The Fat switch which gives your signal chain a ballsy push in the midrange without being nasally. Three positions provide varying levels of midrange enhancement and extra gain for players looking for a brawnier tone.

Wampler found that amps with bright switches were either too bright or too dark, and so a multi-position bright switch rounds out the EQ controls. Six positions of brightness let you dial in just the right amount to liven up your chain before the power section gives it what for.

The Bravado is expertly handwired, point-to-point, in Los Angeles, CA and loaded with top-shelf components for optimal tone.

The Bravado will be available in a 40w head (2x12" cab available) and 1x12" 40w combo!

Full details will be published on the main web site product pages soon, with pre-order links and confirmed release dates! 

Tone chasing just went to the next level!

Cleaning the pots on your pedals...

Scenario time: You’re at a gig and the show is going well. The band is tight, the crowd is loving the music and the bar owner is loving the way you your group have packed the house. You bend over to adjust the gain on your overdrive pedal, and you hear it… and the room hears it. That noisy, scratchy and crackling sound of a dirty pot. It isn’t a gig killer, but it definitely brings the joy down a notch. Resisting the urge to throw that pedal across the room in disgust, there is a way to resurrect it and get it back into full operating order once again. To get started we’ll visit Amazon.com to search for Deoxit Contact Cleaner. (Note, this is available at multiple different outlets, including some vehicle care places, and I’ve even seen it at Guitar Center before. We just chose Amazon out of simplicity).

Deoxit is designed to clean, lubricate and preserve contacts and conductivity, by dissolving the dirt and grime, and it does a great job of it. Though it’s in a liquid form, it is quick drying and will not hurt the pedal at all. Deoxit is effective, but it is also quite strong so some precautions are in order before using it. Being an abrasive substance, you want to use it outdoors in a well ventilated area and not on a windy day. To be extra careful it wouldn’t hurt to wear a face mask to prevent breathing in any of the fumes. The same goes for your eyes, you don’t want this getting into your eyes by accident, so some glasses or other form of protection wouldn’t be a bad idea either. Once you get done with the following steps, be sure to wash your hands as well to prevent some from accidentally getting where it shouldn’t.

 

Step One:

Take the pedal apart to access the pots. Remove the back cover to expose the inner pots and circuit board. If you’re uncomfortable with this process, it’s best to take it to an experienced tech that is familiar with electronics.

 

Step Two:

Each potentiometer has a small opening that will allow the cleaner to get inside and loosen the dirt that has collected in there. As you spray liberally turn the knobs back and forth quickly. This will work the dirt loose and restore the contact needed for clean transitions in your adjustments.

Step Three:

Put the pedal back together and test it out. That scratchiness should be gone. This method can be used on switches as well. Just work the switch as you spray to ensure they are free of dirt and are well lubricated. Deoxit can also be used to clean your inputs and outputs, and even your AC adapter jack can be cleaned this way. Just don’t do it while attached to power. It could void your warranty and/or seriously hurt you.

Now, this is a technique that works most of the time, your mileage may vary but it could save you some time instead of having to go through process of submitting it for repairs.

Brian covers this more in depth in his latest vlog: How to clean dirty & crackling pots (potentiometers) on a pedal...

Product update - 2016

The day that we felt would never arrive is finally here! As you all know, we announced the Mini Ego along with some other pedals in January of this year at Winter NAMM. From that point it has been a metaphorical rollercoaster trying to get the final product out to the players.. Admittedly the announcement was done a bit prematurely, and it was an exercise in frustration trying to get the Mini Ego’s into full release.

In the process, we’ve also had a lot of things going on in the background, with the eventual goal of wanting to convert the entire line to top jacks and soft switching. This is a set of features that players have been requesting for years, and we wanted to make good on our promise to eventually make that happen. With the delay in production for the Mini Ego, we decided to go ahead and pursue the process to make those conversions a reality.

Today, we’re very pleased to announce that our entire line-up has converted over to top jacks and soft relay switching (with the exception of the mini pedals), with several pedals receiving a graphics facelift to signify our next step in evolution. Rest assured that NONE of the tones have changed whatsoever, it’s merely switching to a more advanced, reliable switching system with the added space-saving factor of top jacks. You can check out our website to see the newest versions available. These will be available world-wide (ask your local dealer) as well as direct from our site.

Along with the line-up overhaul, we’re happy to announce that we’re also releasing a new version of the Pinnacle Deluxe, as well as a new Faux Tape Echo! The new Pinnacle will feature an 3-band EQ, Modern and Vintage tone selector, a Gain boost switch, and a footswitchable pre- volume/gain boost (yep, 2 different boosts!). The boost operates by the volume and gain going up simultaneously and despite being standalone, is made to really kick the Pinnacle to the next level of clipping and distortion. The Pinnacle was originally designed with the “Brown sound” in mind, but with this new version Brian wanted to take it a step further and make it one of the most versatile distortions he possibly could. He also decided to include a SAG switch. Players with active pickups or extremely hot pickups sometimes experienced enhanced levels of compression and sag, often requiring the player to lower their pickups. This switch helps solve that issue quickly and effectively.

The new Faux Tape Echo will feature 4 subdivisions, 1/4 note, 1/8th note, dotted 1/8th, and triplets. Along with the graphics and subdivision overhaul, the controls have changed up a bit too. There’s a Delay knob that sets the amount of delay time (up to 600ms of clean repeats, but maxed out around 800ms with some grit added to the notes), Delay Mix that lets you blend in the delay with your dry signal, Repeats lets you select the number of repeats, from one repeat to self-oscillation past the 3pm range. The modulation on/off switch has been removed and we now have dedicated Rate and Depth knobs that let you adjust quickly without having to mess with a switch. Turning these knobs fully counterclockwise will result in no modulation on the repeats. The Tone control controls the repeats only, from darker aka warmer to brighter and a bit more of a digital feel.

All of these products are now available to buy, in store or direct from us via our webstore, which is right here!

SGT Huey Falls USMC Ret.

Here's a nice story...

Many of you are probably aware that we run a gear/tone group on Facebook. We call it the Wampler Pedals Tone Group (I know, how dazzlingly original is that?) and we made it because, well, most gear groups on Facebook appear to be frequented by people who I can't accurately describe here and still keep my job!

We had no idea how it would turn out, if we would have to delete it because those same kind of people came in but I don't know how, but it appears we got really lucky as it appears that the vast vast vast majority of the 6000+ members we have are just great people, looking to talk gear and pedals, and are not interested in being know it all show offs who state opinions as facts!

Since we started the group a couple of years ago you get to recognise certain names and then over a period of time you actually get to know them... You get used to seeing them about!

One of the first people I remember noticing was Huey Falls, purely because every post he made he signed it "SGT Huey Falls USMC Ret." - A man who is obviously extremely proud of his service, and rightly so! I got the impression after chatting to Huey within thread over the months that he wasn't a well man, I had no idea (and still don't) if this is due to his service or something after, I think he's blind also... Anyway, that's how I got to know Huey, albeit not at all, just online in a gear group, you know what I mean.

It was a few weeks ago I noticed I'd not seen him around for a while, and then a day or so later one of our members, Kevin Harrington, made this post in the group - Kevin knew Huey through the group only, and somehow found out he was about to undergo an amputation on his left leg, below the knee. He knew Huey was gassing for a new fuzz, a Velvet Fuzz no less, so he set up this go fund me to help Huey out and it was posted into the Tone Group.

Due to the extreme generosity of the members of the tone group, the $250 goal was quickly reached and breached. It looked like Huey would be his pedal after all!

Now, Alex and I had been watching this for a while and once the target was breached we talked to Brian, and we came to the conclusion that it would be best if we donate Huey a Velvet and then donate the money raised to Huey's charity of choice. Everyone in the group thought this was a grand idea!

So, thanks to the generosity and community spirit of our tone group, Huey's favourite charity of choice is $355 better off and he has his pedal! What a wonderful little community we have here! Thank you Kevin, this is all your doing. You're one of the good ones.

 

 

G-Bender, in a nutshell

After the new shots of the Paisley Drive were posted, we received a lot of messages through Instagram and Facebook regarding the bridge configuration on my Crook Custom Telecaster (pictured above). I just wanted to run through the configuration and mindset behind the bridge setup and give an insight into it after using it for a decade now. I love this guitar dearly, primarily because it’s my father’s. He and I both ordered a Crook at the same time, and they’re identical in terms of pickups and wiring and hardware, but he chose a red paisley with silver flake underneath and a rosewood fretboard, where I chose to pursue a new prototype paint job with a green paisley and the silver flake underneath with a birdeye maple fretboard (pictured).

Let’s start off with low E and A strings. This compensated saddle is made of aircraft grade aluminum. Bill Crook was telling me during the development process that he uses this type of saddle because it provides and extra bit of bite and snap to the lower strings, which can sometimes flub out and sound a bit too undefined (especially using dirt pedals). Next up is a single saddle for the D string, which is also stainless steel. Again, it provides a great bite and twang without being offensive or ice-picky. We’ll skip to the high B and E strings for now (the G string will be discussed in a moment). For the high B and E, Bill decided to go with a brass compensated saddle. He mentioned that after extensive testing that the brass would retain the killer tone without the ice-pick sometimes associated with teles and those strings. The bottom two string are very warm and have loads of sustain going on, but never get muddy.

So the big question is, what’s going on with that funky looking saddle on the G-string? That’s a McVay G-bender mechanism from Charlie McVay. Charlie is a lap-steel player by trade, so he was naturally very affluent with the bending systems in those instruments. Brad always preferred a G-bender to a B-bender  because he felt it was more musical in nature based on what bends you could accomplish. It’s Brad Paisley, so who am I to disagree? Being the superfan that I’ve always been, I got one installed too. Essentially what is going on is a level system that’s installed into the body, with an small “arm” lever that you attach your straplock to instead of directly to the guitar. The way it works, when you pull the guitar neck down towards the floor, the level actually raises the G-string by one who step. This is incredibly fun to include in your regular playing because it allows you the ability to do open string bends to really get twangy. I’ll be the first to admit that I abused it when I first got it, and had to train myself not to rely on bending the g-string with that at not my fingers too. There are two distinct tones between using the bender and manually doing it.

As an example of using a G-bender, I wanted to take a look back at one of my favorite country tunes that’s not too technically difficult, but incredibly fun to play and a great introduction to Brad Paisley’s playing style and the idea behind the bender. (There are two versions of the tab, one without a bender and one with). I loved Brad’s song “Old Alabama” from his album “This is Country Music”, so at the time of release I sat down and tabbed out the intro. In regards to the tones, I use the Ego Compressor for a light squish (sustain at 10:30) but with the blend low(Noon to 2pm) and the attack fully clockwise (slowest). This helps adds that feel of your amp compressing and also smoothes out the notes without that heavy squish on the initial not attack. Next I ran into the Paisley Drive, with the gain said relatively low (10am) and treble to taste. I was using a bright amp (Dr. Z RXJr) so my tone was set at 10:30. The key for me was using the mids in the UP (medium mid hump) position, which is closely based on Brad’s Z-Wreck tone. The volume you want set right above unity. Following the Paisley Drive I went into the Faux Tape Echo set to a light slapback, set with the mix knob just below unity, (repeats fully counter-clockwise, time knob at 9am). This gives the perfect slap that adds the depth and feel to the note to complete the full tonal package.

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And here’s Brad discussing his G-bender (and he’s actually using his prototype Wheelhouse Delay that Brian created for him!)

 

Debunking myths about the Pedal Business

I had a lengthy post regarding all of the things I’ve learned since starting with Wampler over a year ago, but after reaching over 2,000 words, I decided to just condense it into a list of myths about the pedal industry I feel every person should know now that I’ve seen the other side:

  • The builders aren’t any different than any other person. They all put their pants on one leg at a time in the morning. In general, all of the builders I’ve had to honor to meet have been nothing short of amazing, speaking as if they’ve known me forever. The key thing to remember? Most of them usually don’t WANT to be thought of any different. They’re tone chasers just like us. They’ve all just found their niche in the trade, just like skilled workers in other areas. When I met Brian and Jason and Max, I was sweating and nervous as could be. I tried to keep a straight face despite screaming on the insane, but they treated me as equals and like it was another day at work. It was all just a blur at the time, but looking back it drastically changed my perception. They don’t want to be famous, they just happen to be in front of a camera or on social media more than other people!I was nervous the first time I walked up to Robert Keeley, but he came up and gave me a hug and we talked like old friends. The pedal industry is by far one of the friendliest groups I’ve ever seen.
  • Despite pedal costs, there isn’t a load of money in the pedal business. The big thing is that from the process of concept to having the pedal on your board costs a lot of money to create. Research and development, prototyping, PCB changes, mass quantities of parts (we’re talking thousands of a single part per order), building in the United States, paint (thousands of gallons of one particular color, per pedal), printing the graphics, boxes and instructions, and free shipping. All of it cuts off of the bottom-end of the money made. Dealers like to make a little on them as well, so you have to account for that cost too. You’d probably be surprised how little we actually get to take in! That being said, it’s more about the experience and the process than the money. Like Brian told me when I started “If you’re in it to make money, you’re better off outside of the music industry.” It’s a rewarding job though, helping people find the tone that they’ve been hearing in their head.
  • Working NAMM is VERY different than attending NAMM. It’s mind-boggling. I’ve only been to one NAMM (Winter in Anaheim) and it’s a full sensory overload experience.  There’s a noise ordinance at NAMM so vendors and patrons won’t go over a certain dB, and that threshold is usually exceeded as soon as people cut the amps on. If you get too loud, the NAMM police come around and give you warnings. If you get too many warnings for violating the noise level….not good (fines, etc). People are everywhere, where you have to scream over the noise of neighboring booths to talk to tone chasers that walk up to your booth. Working the booth can be very repetitive. You get the same questions over and over again, but luckily if you enjoy it you won’t mind answering them. There’s really no time to sit down, eat, or even go to the bathroom sometimes. At the end of the day when NAMM closes, your ears are clogged like you’ve entered an isolation chamber, and your voice is typically hoarse from talking so loudly all day. Rinse and repeat for the next few days. Some big name guitarists stop by, many of which are just insanely nice people who just excel at their chosen instrument. The same premise applies as the builders; MOST just want to be treated like normal people. It’s a balancing act to meeting your business contacts and creating relationships with new customers, so it’s always hectic. After NAMM is done you break down (several hour job) and head home. There’s one interesting fact I didn’t know existed. Inevitably if you work NAMM, you’ll end up with NAMMthrax. You’re literally shaking hands and talking face-to-face with hundreds of people every day, and everyone ends up catching some kind of head cold or otherkind of sickness that lasts for a few weeks after you get home. In my case, I ended up with a sinus and ear infection, where some people ended up with the full blown flu. It’s just the nature of meeting with so many people in a public space.
  • You’d be amazed how hard it is to find an original name and color for a pedal. This process is often overlooked because the end result is what everyone sees. The process involves checking trademarks, and ensuring that no one has a pedal or music instrument out that already has that name or something extremely close to it. Each name has to be applicable to what the pedal is, and has to be able to have imagery to use along with it. There are loads of names that sound great, but there’s nothing graphically that’s feasible to put onto the small space the graphic takes up on the pedal. The goal is to make all of the pedals flow together visually and stylistically with names, so you have to be wary of that too. To give you an example, the cataPulp was originally going to be called the Pulp Friction…but after some searching it was a 90’s porno. Strike that one off!
  • Social media content isn’t as easy to find as you might think. Being an international company sounds like it would be a breeze to find content to post every day, right? Not so much. With that many viewers, you have to take into account the varying ages, gender, ethnic backgrounds, religious beliefs, political views, and any other thing that might trigger someone to be angry. With so many varying opinions in the world, your list of content gets whittled down before you know it. Content has to be relatable, provide something to the viewer, not tick anyone off, and still be relevant to the brand. So when you see those pictures and posts, give them an extra like :-)
  • Guitar pedal companies don’t have days off generally. It’s a 24/7 business. We have customers around the globe, so there are constantly messages submitted to the main page at all hours of the day and night. When most people are on their holiday break, we’re working because the load increases due to people being off and having time to send messages. That’s not to say that we don’t relax some, but most days still maintain a consistent level of work at minimum. Closer to the end of the year and the holidays, it gets a bit crazier. I stepped away from my family getting ready to open presents on Christmas so I could take care of a couple of things. But if you love it, you do what you have to do!
  • There’s nowhere near as much guitar playing happening as you’d think there would be. As much as I’d love to say it’s trying prototypes all day and getting to jam on free pedals, it’s not the case. It’s spreadsheets, statistics, insight tracking, blog writing, message responding, email typing, and general businessy stuff. I think we’d all go out on a limb here at Wampler and say that we play guitar LESS because of working, but it’s a tradeoff. We’re not playing, but we’re facilitating other players to play more.  
  • Just because there aren’t a load of steady new releases, it doesn’t mean they’re sitting idly. New releases take a lot of prep work (see 2nd bullet point). There are many pedals that will reach prototype phase and never see the light of day. There are also some pedals that have just been released that have been ready for years and it just didn’t feel like the right time to release until then. Pedal builders are always looking ahead, whether it’s their planned releases for months down the road, or researching new technology for something they have planned for a few years ahead. It’s all a chess game that requires patience and planning on the whole teams’ part to bring something to the public in a cohesive manner.
  • Competitors actually like each other in most cases. Just because various companies are trying to reach the same demographic of players with their pedals, it doesn’t mean that they’re cutthroat and despise each other. Many times builders help each other directly, whether its needing help with a particular issue in a design, or just general chit-chat. The pedal building community is unlike any other I’ve seen. It’s a network of family in a sense, where in most cases they all look out for each other and are friends, and share stories of success and heartbreak. They also discuss customers, ones that are known to have fraudulent activities or sketchy dealings. You’d be surprised what builders have helped out on various releases over the years for other companies as well ;-)

As I wrote this list, I hope it didn’t seem negative, because it isn’t intended that way. I’ve been a tone chaser my entire life and my dream has always been to work in the pedal industry (specifically for Brian). These are myths that I had built up in my own head over the years that I had my eyes opened to and learned along the way. It’s an amazing business that requires quite a bit of work, but it’s unbelievably rewarding. Release day for new pedals is like a breath of fresh air, and is exhilarating to see the work that’s been done reach the people it was created for.