It seems just about every time I log in to any one of my social media outlets – I unfortunately come across various stories about bands who have had their gear stolen out of their van, trailer, or even studio. It’s sad that this happens to hard working musicians that often play out to put food on their table. In an instant they lose the tools of their trade and the pieces of gear they have worked hard for and come to love over a lifetime of honing their craft.

While it’s a total shame we have to even think about the safety of our gear – it is unfortunately a variable we have to take in to account and try our best to prepare against. In this blog I wanted to throw out a couple steps that could help protect your gear from getting ripped off or increasing the chances you will get it back if it does get stolen. Some of these are no-brainers but are surprisingly not practiced all that much. If I don’t mention something you to do protect your gear – let me know about it in the comment section below.

Visual: Make sure you are parked in a well-lit, visible area. Lots of clubs have parking in the back that allows you easier access to the stage. While this is often makes for an easier load-in – it also secludes your gear/ vehicle; if it all possible, try to park your car/ trailer right next to the door. Most of the clubs I have played at – will save you a spot if you call ahead. This does a couple things: Puts you near a light(s), puts you close to the bouncer working the door, and will sometimes deter thieves from making a move so close to the building. In between sets I usually have one of my guys keep an eye on the gear and I go out and check on the remaining gear in the car, locks, etc.

For you guys that are lucky enough to have a rehearsal space/ studio – make sure your doors have reinforced locks. Also – if your space has windows – think about ways to block people from the outside looking in/ and make sure they are reinforced against breakage.

Spot Trace GPS

GPS Tracker: So this one is a new one for me – but I will most definitely be investing in one for the future. The Spot Trace (about $100USD) – featured above – is a GPS locater you can put in your band’s trailer. This particular model will send you alerts via your smart phone to let you know if the trailer is moving (in the case of being stolen) and where it is. Pretty cool!

Serial number on random Strat

Records: This is one is kind of boring – but most certainly a necessity. Chances are – pretty much every piece of gear you own has a serial number. Take a few minutes to find the serial numbers of gear and write them all down. Keep the list of serial numbers in a safe place at home. In the event that your gear gets swiped – you can let the authorities know the make/ model/ serial number of your pedal, guitar, amp, etc. You can also then notify local pawn shops/ music shops about the stolen piece of gear and the serial number so they can keep an eye out for it. (Note: also keep a record of any identifying marks your gear might have. Have a guitar with a big gouge in the back by the neck pocket? – Take a picture and keep it with your records.)

Hidden ID: I learned this trick a long time ago but it I think it’s kind of clever. When you open up your pedal or guitar – write your name on a piece of tape and stick it on the inside of your gear. (Or indelible ink if you are keeping the gear forever.) Even if the crooks get rid of the serial number of your pedal – they might not know to look for the hidden name on the inside of your gear – further helping to identify it for the authorities.

Community: Lets face it – musicians, as a whole, are a pretty tight knit community and are for the most part – are a pretty awesome group of people. Get to know one another. In this day and age of social media – news travels quickly. Other than the authorities – there is often not a better of group of people to help you recover stolen gear than fellow musicians who know what to look for!

I know some of this does sound like paranoia – well it is a little. But remember the gear that took you a lifetime to collect, the gear that makes you feel better at the end of the bad day, the gear that helps you express yourself better than words can ever do – can all be lost in a minute to unscrupulous people with no moral standards – looking to make a quick dollar.

Until next time tone chasers!

– Max